Page 48 - NA_5_4_2011

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Bread flour
1340g
2# 15.2 oz
100
(11.7% protein)
Granulated sugar
170g
5.9 oz
12.6
Salt
13g
.45oz
.9
Baking powder
75g
2.6 oz
5.9
Unsalted butter
450g
15.8 oz
33.5
Eggs, whole
250g
8.8 oz
18.6
Buttermilk
700g
1# 7.8 oz
51.8
Blue cheese
200g
7.0 oz
14.9
Toasted pecans
200g
7.0 oz
14.9
Caramelized onions
200g
7.0 oz
14.9
Blue cheese As needed As needed
(for topping)
Pecans As needed As needed
(for topping)
Dried or candied
400g
14.0 oz
19.8
fruits for a
sweet scone
Lemon or orange 1 each 1 each
zest as an option
46 Pastry & Baking
North America
I
Artisan Baker
Publisher’s Note:
Ciril Hitz is the Department Chair for
the International Baking and Pastry Institute at Johnson &
Wales University in Providence, Rhode Island. He has been
recognized both nationally and internationally with numerous
awards and accomplishments. More information on Ciril and
his work can be viewed on his web site: www.breadhitz.com.
by
t seems that lately I am spending more time in either a plane
or car than I really care to. Don’t get me wrong... travel is a
necessary part of what I love to do, which is to share my
baking knowledge with others. But those long drives, early morning
flights, and lonely airport layovers are starting to take their toll.
My schedule has been crazy and one of the biggest challenges I have
encountered as a result is satisfying my morning hunger or afternoon
craving. After all, between last-minute details, check-in, and security,
who has the time to eat? I tend to order my standard: a triple grande
caramel macchiato (light on the caramel!) along with a blueberry scone.
By then my stomach is rumbling and I am feeling a bit light-headed
(and quite frankly, anything would hit the spot.) Most of the time the
coffee is too sweet and the scone too dry, but I eat it anyway because
those 20 mini pretzels I might get on the plane just won’t cut it.
So with this experience in mind, I am inspired to share with you my
classic buttermilk scone formula. I love it because it can be tailored to
either a sweet or savory product, depending on what you need or crave.
Even the pickiest scone aficionado will be satisfied with these scones.
Looking back, I have visited some amazing places this past summer
and have made some wonderful connections with people from all over
the world. Now, if I could only take my scone matters into my own hands
and make a batch up the night before I hit the road.Maybe next summer.
Buttermilk Scones:
Savory or Sweet to
SuitYour Fancy
Ingredients
Grams
Pounds
Final
and ounces dough%
1. Sift all of the dry ingredients together.
2. Work butter by hand into dry ingredients until butter pieces
are the size of a pea.
3. Whisk together the liquid ingredients.
4. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and fill with
all of the liquid ingredients.
5. Work the two ingredients together, folding the dry into the
wet.
6. When batter is still a little lumpy, add the nuts, cheese and
onions.
• If making the sweet version, add the dried fruit at the same
time as you would add the savory ingredients.
7. Place batter on dusted table and fold together until it is
workable.
8. Roll out to
5
/
8
” thick and cut accordingly.
9. Place on parchment-lined sheet pan and let rest for
1
/
2
hour.
10. Brush top with egg wash and garnish with whole (untoasted)
pecans and some blue cheese crumble.
• If making the sweet version, brush with egg wash and garnish
with some sanding sugar or make a sugar glaze and finish
after the bake.
11. Bake at 350-360
º
F in convection oven for approximately
15 minutes.
Final Weight
3598g 7# 14.9 oz