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50 Pastry & Baking
North America
Sweet Spectrum
At around the time he turned 20, he developed a severe
allergy to fish, which prevented him from continuing his
culinary career. An obvious alternative for him was to
focus on baking. He enjoys breads because they are savory
and naturally go well with a meal. Today he feels that
teaching is the best job in the foodservice industry. It
allows him to train students from all over the world,
making the experience exciting and rewarding.
Pane Siciliano is semolina bread made in Sicily.
Typically, baked goods that are “Siciliano” (Sicilian-style)
are made with semolina, garnished with sesame seeds,
or both. The bread is made in three distinct shapes: a
stylized “S” for “Sicily”, a crown or “corona,” or an inverted
“S” shape referred to as “Occhi di Santa Lucia.”
Occhi
or
“eyes” is in honor of a Sicilian saint who was blinded for
giving her dowry away to the poor. For the saint’s feast
day in Sweden, a version of this bread is flavored and
dyed yellow with saffron. Note: Use a super-premium
extra virgin olive oil, such as Regina from Dickson Ranch
in Napa, CA.
Pane Siciliano
by
By Aaron Brown
Photography by Kristin Loken
Equipment
Steam injection deck oven
40-quart standing mixer – dough hook attachment
4 sheet pans
Holding containers
Pastry brush
Plastic bowl scraper
Bench scraper
Scale
Publisher’s Note:
Aaron Brown, CB, CHE, is
a baking instructor at The Culinary Institute of
America at Greystone in St. Helena, CA, where
he teaches students in the college’s associate
degree programs in culinary arts and baking and
pastry arts. Chef Brown trained at the Grand
Central Baking Co. and owned Spent Grain Baking
Co., both in Seattle,WA. He has also worked for
Il Fornaio in Portland, OR; Las Vegas, NV; and
Denver CO. Most recently, Chef Brown was head
baker for Big River Breads in Corvallis, OR.
C
hef Brown began working as a dishwasher at age
15 and quickly became passionate about cooking.
He soon was promoted to cooking on the line.
A Bread in the OldWorld Tradition