Page 68 - Pastry & Baking Magazine

66
Pastry & Baking
North America
Ancient Grains
Publisher’s Note:
The San Francisco Baking
Institute (SFBI) is a world-renowned leader in
artisan bread and pastry education and consulting.
More information on SFBI can be found at
.
Having always been drawn to cooking and baking
from a very young age, Juliette Lelchuk enjoys
teaching pastry and viennoiserie at SFBI.
By Juliette Lelchuk
Photography by Tchell DePaepe
standpoint, but its strength in dough is similar to that of
common soft wheat flour. It lends a golden color and a pleasant
nutty flavor to baked products. Einkorn also contains a
significantly higher level of carotenoids than other flour types,
whose antioxidant properties play a large role against many
degenerative diseases.
Here we combine einkorn flour with white spelt flour to highlight
the performance of unique wheat varietals in laminated dough.
White (refined) spelt flour offers higher strength and more
open crumb in the final product. Einkorn flour, which is never
refined and therefore available as only a whole grain flour, offers
flavor and nutritional benefit but lacks the strength to be used
in a quantity much greater than the suggested 20% in this
formula. The combination of the two flours yields a croissant
dough with good structure whose lamination is showcased well
when shaped as Danish, due to its flat shape and visibility of
the layers.
Einkorn is currently produced inYugoslavia, parts of Switzerland,
Italy, Germany, Spain, Turkey, Albania, and Canada, the latter
of which being the closest source for the United States. As a
nod to Italy, who now uses einkorn in some pasta and bread
production, we have chosen a ricotta filling with Italian flavors
as a perfect complement to this unique grain. Like einkorn, figs
are another ancient crop, and an excellent match for creamy
ricotta and citrus zest. Naturally, the beautiful and distinctive
shape of the fig leaf is the ideal form for this pastry.
E
inkorn, meaning “one grain” in German, is the oldest
known variety of wheat, dating back as far as 15,000
BC. It is overall high in protein from a nutritional
Equipment list:
Mixer, bowl and dough hook
Thermometer
Rolling pin
Bench knife
Freezer
Sheet trays and parchment paper
Fig leaf cutter
Piping bag
Pastry brush and eggwash
Apricot glaze, powdered sugar and dried fig halves
Einkorn Croissant
80
White spelt
0.475
20
Einkorn
0.119
20
Water
0.119
28
Milk
0.166
12.9
Sugar
0.077
1.9
Salt
0.011
1.2
Gold yeast
0.007
0.4
Malt
0.002
4
Butter
0.024
168.4
Total
1.000
25
European style low
0.250
moisture butter,
for lamination (83%) fat
Baker’s % Ingredient Kilogram
Einkorn Croissant
Yield: About 35 3”x5” fig shaped Danish